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Bach flowers - Therapeutic aggravation or healing crisis with Bach flowers

Bach flowers - Therapeutic aggravation or healing crisis with Bach flowers


THE FLOWERS OF BACH
or
FLORITHERAPY

THERAPEUTIC AGGRAVATION
or
HEALING CRISIS


Note 1

It has been ascertained that it is possible, during the treatment with Bach flower remedies, especially in the first days, that "you do not feel well" that is to say that for example you can suffer from a sudden fever; or you feel pains that were not there before; or one feels particularly depressed or vice versa cheerful; you feel a tiredness that you did not have before; there is a worsening of the symptoms from which one tries to heal; there is a feeling of cold; sweating and urinating excessively; it is difficult to sleep, in short, a particular symptomatology that was not felt before. This fact is commonly called "therapeutic aggravation" or "healing crisis" and is to be considered a positive fact as it means that the Bach flowers have started to act and rebalance the body by moving the altered vibrations for their rebalancing. This aggravation must therefore be seen as a more than positive fact from the point of view of the organism's reaction to wanting to quickly remove the disease that afflicts it.

During the therapeutic aggravation, which in any case will last only a few days, it is not necessary to resort to drugs but you must try to relax, to be calm and you must strive to continue taking the remedies, at the most they can be reduced for example by four times a day for two and then resume the normal dose as soon as the malaise subsides.

It is possible in cases where the pain or discomfort is particularly annoying, to stop taking the Bach flower remedies until the pain or particular pathology has passed. At most you can make use of the Rescue Remedy with the glass method.

In any case, the best thing is to stay as calm as possible and try to endure the discomfort by continuing to take the remedies so as not to interrupt the healing process.

Note
1. Original photograph courtesy of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service / Dr. Thomas Barnes