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Information About Desert Sunflower

Information About Desert Sunflower


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Desert Sunflower Info: Learn About Hairy Desert Sunflower Care

By Mary H. Dyer, Credentialed Garden Writer

Hairy desert sunflowers have been tagged with a rather unappealing name, but the yellow daisy-like blooms with bright orange centers are anything but dull. Want to learn how to grow desert sunflowers? (It’s easy!) Click here for more desert sunflower information.


How to Grow a Sunflower in a Pot

Last Updated: February 8, 2021 References Approved

This article was co-authored by Artemisia Nursery. Artemisia Nursery is a retail plant nursery in Northeast Los Angeles specializing in California native plants. Artemisia Nursery is a worker-owned small business with plans to become a worker-owned cooperative. In addition to California native plants, Artemisia Nursery offers a selection of succulents, heirloom veggie and herb starts, house plants, pottery, and gardening tools and supplies. Drawing on the knowledge of the founders, Artemisia Nursery also offers consultations, designs, and installations.

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Sunflowers are native American plants with many uses. Their oil is used for biodiesel and cooking oil, and their seeds can make tasty snacks. A sunflower also makes a bright and happy addition to any sunny window or balcony. Growing a sunflower in a pot is an easy project that even small children can enjoy. [1] X Research source


"Agriculture and seeds provide the basis upon which our lives depend. We must protect this foundation as a safe and genetically stable source for future generations. For the benefit of all farmers, gardeners and consumers who want an alternative, We pledge that we do not knowingly buy, sell or trade genetically engineered seeds or plants.

The mechanical transfer of genetic material outside of natural reproductive methods and between genera, families or kingdoms, poses great biological risks as well as economic, political, and cultural threats. We feel that genetically engineered varieties have been insufficiently tested prior to public release. More research and testing is necessary to further assess the potential risks of genetically engineered seeds. Further, we wish to support agricultural progress that leads to healthier soils, genetically diverse agricultural ecosystems and ultimately healthy people and communities."