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Yellow Echeveria

Yellow Echeveria


Succulentopedia

Echeveria lutea (Yellow Echeveria)

Echeveria lutea (Yellow Echeveria) is a beautiful small succulent that forms a solitary rosette of narrow, reddish-purple leaves. The…


Prickly Pear Cactus

@opuntiateam

This cactus has beautiful, delicate flowers that remind us of peonies. Yes the very famous peonies. Some species of Prickly Pear have red or purple flowers, but we prefer the ones that have yellow blooms. Our favorite species is Opuntia Humifusa, also known as Low Prickly Pear. It has those vibrant yellow flowers that we’re after!

This species also produces edible fruit and has green, fleshy pads covered with thorns that can be eaten, too. You can grill, sautee, boil, pickle, or fry them. You can even eat them raw and serve them up in salads. Just make sure that you clean off the spines first! We made an article listing the best cactus gloves for your garden activities!

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Yellow Echeveria - garden

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Comments (12)

Rina_Ontario,Canada 5a

If i lost all of the leaves, it would have been probably overwatered- at least that what I suspect. Oldest leves will dry up and fall, but just one-two at the time.

Bottom of the stem seems to be black - check to make sure it is not rotted. Check the roots too. I would plant damaged stems separately.

I see more yellpwing on oher stems - have you been watering it a lot?

Chroma seems to be planted with hardy succulents. Are they all outside? What zone are you in?


Visually Stunning Echeveria Species

These Echeveria species are know for their unique and stunning displays:

Echeveria affinis (Black Knight)

This somewhat common succulent is celebrated for its intensely dark foliage that grows from dark green into purple-black. Often touted as a succulent gift for men, it will truly be at home with any plant keeper!

This plant makes a wonderful contrast in succulent arrangements and rock gardens and keeps to a tidy maximum size of 6 inches wide and up to 5 inches tall. This plant is very easy to keep!

E. affinis has also been crossed with E. shaviana to produce ‘Black Prince,’ another deep purple-black rosette that looks fantastic in a rock garden and keeps a small stature.

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, does best in cool, full sun. In especially hot climates, morning sun may be better to avoid burning the leaves. Indoors, as close to or in a south or east facing window receiving as much light as possible.
  • Water only when the soil dries completely. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining succulent mix.
  • Repot once it outgrows its current container or every couple of years.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates easily with leaf cuttings.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Intermediate.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs.

Echeveria runyonii ‘Topsy Turvy’

Forest & Kim Starr [CC BY 3.0]

This mutant form gone cultivar is best known for its “upside-down” leaves, which have an indent causing the leaves to tent. It has taken warm climate gardeners by storm with the fun texture and large size it adds to a garden!

Topsy Turvy will reach up to 8 inches tall and 10 inches wide. In late summer to early fall, it produces orange star-shaped blooms.

There is some disagreement over whether Topsy Turvy should be grown indoors. It does fabulously as an outdoor plant in warm climates.

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, full sun where it is shaded from the heat of afternoon sun. Indoors, the brightest window available. Move the plant if it burns, as its burns will not heal.
  • Water only when the soil dries completely. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Minimal to no watering during the winter. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining, gritty succulent mix.
  • Repot in the spring once it outgrows its container or every other year.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 7b-10. Kept as an annual or overwinter indoors in cooler climates.
  • Propagates most easily with offsets pulled in the spring. It will also propagate from leaf and stem cuttings as well as seed.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Beginner.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

Echeveria lutea (Yellow Echeveria)

Yellow Echeveria may be named for its head-turning yellow flowers, but it is just as eye-catching for its curled leaves which form a hollow needle. Since the underside of the leaves is often a different shade from the top, it develops a bi-color look due to the contrast in unrolling.

With water stress or heat, its leaves will take on deep purple and red hues. If it doesn’t have enough light, the leaves will unfurl completely and become a paler green.

This plant is small and compact, not quite reaching 6 inches wide producing tiny, yellow flowers on an inflorescence. It makes a wonderful rock garden companion.

  • Lighting requirements: Outside, partial sun or shade, may handle full sun in temperate climates. Indoors, bright light. Keep shaded for flatter, greener leaves.
  • Water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet. This plant will do best watered regularly in the growing season but still needs its soil to dry slightly before watering again.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repot in the spring once it outgrows its container or every other year.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b, but its full range is not established. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates most commonly with seeds or by removing offsets.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Intermediate.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

Echeveria ‘Cubic Frost’

Much like the Echeveria runyonii ‘Topsy Turvy’, the Cubic Frost sports upturned leaves. However, this hybrid also has silvery, powdery leaves and blushes hues of pinks.

Not only is Cubic Frost—PPAF (plant patent applied for) itself—an attractive plant all on its own, there are many varieties of Cubic Frost, quite a few patented or patent pending as well! One variety, the Cubic Frost Cristata, is a crowned purple Cubic Frost.

This is a fairly large Echeveria at up to 10 inches in diameter and 8 inches tall once matured.

No matter what variety of Cubic Frost you happen to find, it will be colorful and attractive to any passerby!

  • Lighting requirements:
    • Outdoors: morning sun shaded from the hot afternoon, may handle full sun in temperate climates.
    • Indoors: bright light.
  • Water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet. This plant does best with infrequent watering.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repot in the spring once it outgrows its container or every other year.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates most commonly with leaf cuttings.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Beginner.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

Echeveria ‘Blue Curls’

Looking for a little drama on a really unusual succulent? For an Echeveria, ‘Blue Curls’ is your girl.

There’s a lot of debate and mystery as to the history of this mysterious hybrid. Its creator hasn’t been pinned down and has several suspected parents. The best guess for what it’s a hybrid of is that it may involve Echeveria gibbiflora and a sister seedling to the similar Echeveria ‘Blue Waves.’ At this time, it’s not for sure where this hybrid originated from.

In the garden, where none of that matters, this is a unique succulent almost resembling a multi-colored head of kale! It will grow up to 10 inches wide boasting pinks and blues in large, frilly rosettes. It is a wonderful accompaniment to any garden!

  • Lighting requirements:
    • Outdoors: full sun to partial shade. Should be protected from the hot afternoon sun.
    • Indoors: bright light.
  • Water only once the soil dries. Drench but do not leave soil soggy. Avoid getting rosettes wet and dry any that do get wet.
  • The soil mix should be any well-draining, porous succulent mix.
  • Repot in the spring once it outgrows its container or every other year.
  • Winter Hardy in Zones 9a-11b. Kept as an annual or overwintered indoors in other climates.
  • Propagates best from leaf cuttings and any offsets that appear.
  • Special maintenance is primarily removing any dead leaves immediately.
  • Experience level: Beginner.
  • Susceptible to mealybugs, vine weevil, and aphids.

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