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Thryallis Shrub Care – How To Grow Thryallis Plants

Thryallis Shrub Care – How To Grow Thryallis Plants


By: Mary Ellen Ellis

If you’re looking for year-round blooms and an ornamental shrub for your sub-tropical garden, look no further than the low-maintenance and gorgeous thryallis. With just a little thryallis plant info, you can easily grow this pretty, warm-climate shrub.

What is a Thryallis Plant?

Thryallis (Galphimia glauca) is an evergreen shrub of medium size that produces yellow flowers year round. It thrives in sub-tropical climates, and in the U.S. is becoming more popular for hedging and ornamental use in South Florida.

Thryallis grows to about six to nine feet (two to three m.) tall and forms a dense and compact oval shape. It can be used alone or alternated with other shrubs to create a variety of textures, sizes and colors in a hedge.

How to Grow Thryallis Shrubs

Growing thryallis shrubs is not difficult if you live in the right climate. In the U.S. it thrives in South Florida, the southern tip of Texas, parts of Arizona, and along the coast of California. Find a location in your garden with full sun to help this bush grow best and produce the most flowers. Once your thryallis is established, it will tolerate drought well so watering is not usually necessary.

Thryallis shrub care is not very labor intensive, one great reason to use it as an ornamental shrub. There are no known pests or diseases to worry about and even deer won’t nibble on this shrub. The only maintenance you may need to perform is to preserve the level of formality you prefer. These shrubs can be trimmed into tight shapes, thanks to their density, but they can also be left to grow more natural and still look nice.

If you are thinking of growing thryallis shrubs in your yard or garden, just be sure you have the right climate for it. These bushes will not tolerate cold temperatures and you may lose them over the winter in a freeze. Otherwise, with warmth and sun, your thryallis will thrive, grow, and add color to your garden.

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How to Prune a Thryallis

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Thryallis (Galphimia glauca) is a small evergreen tropical shrub that is hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 9 to 11. Often used as a hedge due to its dense thicket of stems, this easy-to-grow, drought-resistant shrub works well as a background plant in garden beds. Thryallis can grow to a height and width of over 6 feet. Though low-maintenance, this shrub may require occasional pruning to maintain its shape and at least one hard pruning per year.

Mix together 1 part 70 percent isopropyl rubbing alcohol with 1 part water in a 5-gallon bucket to create a 50 percent disinfecting solution. Soak garden tools for 5 minutes. Rinse with water and use immediately. Always disinfect garden tools before use to prevent the spread of plant-borne illness and disease.

Cut dead, old or overcrowded stems back to their base just above the branch collar (the swollen portion of the branch where the stem connects to its parent base) with hand loppers after the first frost. Cut new, flowered stems at an angle near the base just above the first true bud. Prune between 1/3 to 1/2 of thryallis' total growth in this way. This is considered hard pruning and should be done once per year in autumn or early winter. Though the thryallis may seem unattractive after such heavy pruning, this will encourage strong growth during the next growing season.

Hold the pruning shears flush with the edge of thryallis' leaves and snip in wide, sweeping cuts to maintain its desired shape and height. Prune once in this manner during the spring in March or early April. Prune again during the summer growing season only if thryallis exceeds its desired height. Thryallis flowers grow on the ends of its branches and will be lost with each pruning, so it is best to allow thryallis to grow naturally after the initial spring pruning.

  • Thryallis is a low-maintenance shrub and does not require much pruning.
  • Hard pruning in the winter may result in loss of flowers the following summer. However, this method of pruning stimulates strong growth and is recommended to maintain healthy plants.
  • If you are unsure how much to cut during a hard pruning, err on the side of caution and cut no more than 1/3 of the thryallis' total growth.

Based in Fort Worth, Sarah Mason has been writing articles since 2009 on topics including nutrition, fitness, women's health and gardening. Her work has appeared in "Flourish" and "Her Campus." Mason holds a Bachelors of Arts in economics from the University of Florida.


Golden Thryallis, Gold Shower, Spray of Gold Overview

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Resources

Thryallis (Galphimia glauca)

This drought-tough shrub needs very little water to be happy. It’s ideal to screen a view or add yellow accent flowers against purple-flowering shrubs like Duranta (Duranta erecta) or near Texas sage/cenizo (Leucophyllum frutescens).

Light: Prefers full sun but can take part shade.

Soil: Any soil type, but does prefer good drainage. Do not overwater. Do water to establish.

Flowers: Yellow flowers cover it from spring until frost.

Leaves: Deciduous in most winters.

Hardiness: It’s listed to about 25?, but even when temperatures dip lower, it’s normally root hardy. If freeze damaged, simply cut back and it will quickly rebound in spring.

Care: Low. No need to fertilize if in decent soil. Pests aren’t a problem. If it gets out of bounds, simply prune back and shape.

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March To Do List

Plant: ornamental & wildlife

  • Annuals: It’s a tricky month for annuals since we get hot days. But the soil is still cold and freezes could still arrive. Late: plant cosmos, sunflowers, morning glory, gomphrena but keep an eye on upcoming freezes. Avoid planting caladiums.
  • Wildflower transplants: early in month, you can still plant bluebonnet, larkspur, poppy and other transplants.
  • Perennials & vines
  • Ornamental (clumping) grasses like muhly and Mexican feather grass (late month)
  • Trees, shrubs, roses (as soon as possible before heat sets in)

Plant: herbs

  • Nasturtiums, chives, catnip, comfrey, fennel, horseradish, feverfew, oregano, thyme, rosemary, Mexican mint marigold, peppermint, lemongrass (after last freeze)

Plant: food crops

  • Chard, corn, cucumber, eggplant, endive, Malabar spinach, mustard, peppers, pumpkin, summer & winter squash, tomatillos (you need at least two!), tomatoes, beans, cantaloupe
  • Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Vegetable Planting Guides (Central Texas)

  • Roses (early)
  • Evergreen shrubs
  • Prune dormant perennials and ornamental (clumping) grasses.
  • Trees: DO NOT prune red oaks and live oaks unless damaged. Spray immediately with clear varnish.
  • No need to apply pruning paint to other trees
  • Avoid topping crape myrtles: simply remove sprouts or entire limbs at the trunk.

  • Dormant perennials, roses, shrubs and trees. Still time, but don’t wait!

  • Citrus with high nitrogen fertilizer like Citrus-tone. Fertilize every few weeks through growing season.
  • Add compost to beds as you cut back dormant perennials. Fertilize with slow-release granular late in the month or as dormant perennials leaf out
  • Add compost around trees and fertilize. Be sure to dig out grass several feet from the trunk, ideally to the drip line of the tree canopy.
  • Watch for powdery mildew. Apply a natural fungicide like Serenade.

  • Mow weeds before they set seed. Do not fertilize at this time except with compost!
  • Plant native Habiturf seeds after soil prep
  • Plant other turf late in month once freezes aren’t coming

  • Add compost to vegetable gardens along with organic fertilizer in prep for more summer crops
  • Soil test

Other tasks

  • Keep floating row cover available avoid covering plants with plastic
  • Mulch, but avoid touching the base of trees and roses
  • Till in winter cover crops
  • WEED!

  • When planting, dig hole twice as wide as root ball but no deeper than where it sits in the pot.
  • Backfill and water until it sinks in.
  • Continue filling in.
  • Water again until it sinks in and pack the soil down.
  • Mulch.


Thryallis Overview

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How To Fertlize & Water Thryallis

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Thryallis Pests / Problems

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Watch the video: How to grow and care of Galphimia plant. Grow Galphimia from cuttings. Galphimia complete duidance